Beam (nautical)

The beam of a ship is its width at the widest point as measured at the ship’s nominal waterline. The beam is a bearing projected at right-angles from the fore and aft line 4 bottle hydration belt, outwards from the widest part of ship. Beam may also be used to define the maximum width of a ship’s hull, or maximum width plus superstructure overhangs.

Generally speaking, the wider the beam of a ship (or boat) best steel water bottle, the more initial stability it has, at expense of reserve stability in the event of a capsize, where more energy is required to right the vessel from its inverted position.

Typical length-to-beam ratios for small sailboats are from 2:1 (dinghies to trailerable sailboats around 20 ft or 6 m) to 5:1 (racing sailboats over 30 ft or 10 m).

Large ships have widely varying beam ratios, some as large as 20:1.

Rowing shells designed for flatwater racing may have length to beam ratios as high as 30:1, while a coracle has a ratio of almost 1:1 – it is nearly circular water bottle facts.

The beam of many monohull vessels can be calculated using the following formula:

Where LOA is Length Overall and all units are in feet.

Some examples:

As catamarans have more than one hull, there is a different beam calculation for this kind of vessel.

BOC stands for Beam On Centerline. This term in typically used in conjunction with LOA (Length overall). The ratio of LOA/BOC is used to estimate the stability of multihull vessels

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. The lower the ratio the greater the boat’s stability.

The BOC for vessels is measured as follows: For a catamaran: the perpendicular distance from the centerline of one hull to the centerline of the other hull, measured at deck level. For a trimaran: the perpendicular distance between the centerline of the main hull and the centerline of either ama, measured at deck level

Other meanings of ‚beam‘ in the nautical context are: